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Infant vision studies

Smiling researcher holding a baby wearing an EEG sensor net.

One of our tiny participants modeling an EEG sensor net

Infant vision studies

At SVNDL we want to learn more about how infants develop different visual abilities -- like detecting a face or keeping track of changing images -- and how changes in the brain guide the development of these abilities. One of the ways we find out more about how a baby's brain functions is from patterns observed in the electrical activity of a the brain while the baby views images on a computer screen. We use a safe and non-invasive procedure called EEG (electroencephalography) to measure brain activity. 

EEG involves placing a mildly wet net of sensor's on your baby's head. Each sensor rests on the scalp and can be thought of like a little microphone that picks up the activity from the brain. If you decide to participate, your visit will take about 45-60 minutes, but the procedure itself is usually 15 minutes. You will be with your baby the entire time. Many parents have a fun experience in the lab and enjoy learning more about their baby!


If you are interested in participating or would like to get more information about our studies, please contact us!  We are happy to answer any questions you may have. Without your participation we wouldn't be able to answer these important developmental questions, so we appreciate your support and hope to see you soon!

We are currently looking for:      (2/26/14) Babies between 4 and 8 months old.

You can call 650-736-2793 or send an email at vision_lab_studies@lists.stanford.edu.

***Our Lab is part of the Center for Infant Studies at Stanford***